Home / DoD / FBI Names Joseph M. Demarest, Jr. Asst. Director of International Operations

FBI Names Joseph M. Demarest, Jr. Asst. Director of International Operations

demarestThe FBI has named Joseph M. Demarest, Jr. assistant director of its International Operations Division, with duties that include leading the agency’s international and overseas law enforcement and liaison efforts.

“In his new role, Joe will be responsible for more than 600 FBI employees here at FBI headquarters and across the globe in our legal attaché offices,” Director Robert S. Mueller, III said. “IOD plays an integral role in our national security mission by building trusted relationships with our foreign law enforcement and intelligence partners.”

Demarest joined the FBI in 1988 as a special agent. Initially, he was assigned to the Anchorage division, where he investigated white-collar crime, drug, violent crime and foreign counterintelligence cases. In 1990, he transferred to the New York division, where he was assigned to a Colombian drug squad. He was promoted to squad supervisor in 1999, and was selected as SWAT team leader. In 2000, he served as the drug branch’s acting assistant special agent in charge.

After 9/11, Demarest held positions with increasing responsibilities, including shift commander for the PENTTBOM investigation; unit chief at FBI headquarters; assistant section chief of the International Terrorism Operations Section; acting section chief; and special agent in charge for counterterrorism, a role he had until 2008.

In January 2009, Demarest began serving as assistant director in charge of the New York division, where he oversaw several major investigations, including the terrorism investigation OPERATION HIGHRISE; the Bernard Madoff case; and the piracy investigation of MV Maersk Alabama.

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