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CBO: US Ports Cybersecurity Bill Would Cost $38M Through 2022

A Congressional Budget Office report says a proposed bill that would address the cybersecurity of U.S. ports would cost $38 million to implement over the 2018 to 2022 period.

The Strengthening Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Coordination in Our Ports Act of 2017 would also authorize the U.S. Coast Guard to undertake cybersecurity-related activities, CBO said Friday.

The bill would not affect direct spending or revenue and would not raise net direct spending or on-budget deficits in four consecutive 10-year periods beginning 2028, the report noted.

CBO added that the proposed legislation would enforce intergovernmental and private sector mandates on owners and operators of port facilities and vessels.

The report says it would cost public and private entities $78 million and $156 million, respectively, to comply with the mandates in 2017.

The legislation would require DHS to foster cybersecurity information sharing between maritime stakeholders in government and industry as well as build a model for maritime cybersecurity risk assessment, among others.

DHS said it would need additional funds to implement some of the mandated efforts — particularly the requirement to boost information sharing.

The funding increase would primarily cover additional personnel that would design and deploy data sharing systems as well as perform analytical support.

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