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Navy CIO Blog Goes Silent

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Newly installed Department of Navy Chief Information Officer Terry Halvorsen is ending a storied practice as the head of the Navy’s IT that could have Gov 2.0 ramifications throughout government.

He’s ending the Navy CIO blog.

In a posting earlier this month, titled appropriately enough “The CIO’s Last Blog,” Halvorsen said the blog, first started by former Navy CIO Rob Carey, would go dark.

“I’m sure you’ll find it interesting and maybe a bit ironic that the new CIO’s first blog is his last blog,” Halvorsen wrote Dec. 1.

He was quick to point out his belief in the value of social media and even its place within the Navy.

“However,” he added, “as I am focusing on finishing up my duties as deputy commander of Navy Cyber Forces and taking the reigns as DON CIO, blogging must be a lower priority.”

Instead, he will “fully engage” with Navy and other officials through “face-to-face meetings when possible.”

Halvorsen’s predecessor, Carey, who now works as the deputy chief information officer for the Defense Department, became the first federal CIO to pen a public blog in 2008 and was also the first Navy CIO to issue a Gov 2.0 policy.

Public blogging by federal officials has taken off recently.

The Office of Management and Budget is home to a prolific number of bloggers. All three officials who have served as the director of that office under President Barack Obama have blogged regularly for the OMB site, including, most recently, Jack Lew.

The Treasury Department rolled out a new blog last week, with Secretary Timothy F. Geithner penning a welcome note.

In an ExecutiveGov review of government blogs earlier this year, General Services Administration CIO Casey Coleman came out on top with the “best government blog.”

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