Home / News / NASA Marshall Test-Fires 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Parts; Elizabeth Robertson Comments

NASA Marshall Test-Fires 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Parts; Elizabeth Robertson Comments

rocket-launchA team of researchers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama has produced and tested 3-D printed parts of a rocket engine.

The rocket engine components such as valves, injectors and turbopumps produced a maximum thrust of 20,000 pounds during seven separate live-fire tests that used liquid oxygen and cryogenic liquid hydrogen as propellants, NASA said Dec. 18.

“We manufactured and then tested about 75 percent of the parts needed to build a 3-D printed rocket engine,” said Elizabeth Robertson, project manager for the additive manufacturing-based demonstrator engine at NASA MSFC.

“By testing the turbopumps, injectors and valves together, we’ve shown that it would be possible to build a 3-D printed engine for multiple purposes such as landers, in-space propulsion or rocket engine upper stages.”

MSFC plans to use methane and liquid oxygen as propellants in future engine tests.

Check Also

GAO: Air Force to Deploy New Combat Rescue Helicopters to Active Component by FY 2020

The Government Accountability Office has found that the U.S. Air Force intends to start fielding in fiscal 2020 new Combat Rescue Helicopters to replace aging HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters that have recorded the most flight time when it comes to staff recovery missions. GAO said in a report published Thursday the service will initially deploy the new helicopters to the active component six years ahead of the reserve component and to the Air National Guard by 2027.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *