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Mary Miller Named DoD Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Research, Engineering

Mary Miller
Mary Miller

Mary Miller, formerly deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Army for research and technology, has been named principal deputy assistant secretary for research and engineering at the Defense Department’s office of the defense undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Miller’s appointment to the Senior Executive Service role in a DoD release published Tuesday.

Miller most recently led the Army’s research and technology programs, overseeing an annual budget of approximately $2 billion and managing 16 research and engineering centers and laboratories.

She spent five years as director for technology at the office of the assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition, logistics and technology and four years as deputy director of technology for aviation, missiles, soldier and precision strike at DoD.

Miller was former lead of the nonlinear optical processes team at the Army Research Laboratory and head of the advanced optics team under the night-vision and electro-optics directorate’s laser division within the Army’s Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

She joined the service branch in 1984 as an electronics engineer.

Miller holds four patents for sensor protection designs and is a recipient of the Army Research & Development Achievement Award in recognition of her work on nonlinear materials for sensor protection.

She has Level 3 certification in program management and systems planning, research, development and engineering for systems engineering as well as Level 2 certification in SPRDE for program systems engineering.

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