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CBO: House’s Social Security Fraud Prevention Bill Would Not Have Significant Cost Over 5 Years

The Congressional Budget Office has said the implementation of a House bill that would bar federal agencies to include Social Security numbers on documents delivered by mail in order to prevent identity fraud would not result in any significant cost in the next five years.

CBO said in the report published Friday the Social Security Fraud Prevention Act of 2017 would result in the application of pay-as-you-go procedures since its passage could increase direct spending by federal agencies that do not receive funds via annual appropriations.

The legislation does not contain private-sector or intergovernmental mandates under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and would not lead to on-budget deficit growth “in any of the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2028.”

The bill would not affect revenues and would not impose costs on local, state and tribal government agencies.

The House unanimously approved a similar bipartisan bill in September 2016 nearly a year after Reps. David Valadao (R-Californa) and Eric Swalwell (D-California) introduced the legislation.

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