Home / News / NSF to Award Cornell University $2.5M Grant to Develop Cryptographic Mechanisms for Software Security

NSF to Award Cornell University $2.5M Grant to Develop Cryptographic Mechanisms for Software Security

The National Science Foundation will award up to $2.5 million in federal funds to Cornell University to develop cryptographic mechanisms to secure software platforms.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) said in a statement published Friday that Cornell will create cryptographic systems with the use of a programming language and the Viaduct platform.

Viaduct is designed to convert collected protocols into primitive cryptographic building blocks that create machine-checkable security systems.

Cornell University will conduct demonstrations, tutorials and workshops to advocate the product’s usage and demonstrate its capacity to offer end-to-end synthesis.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said the funds will help Cornell develop systems that can protect personal information from potential hacker attacks.

“I will continue to support more federal funding for scientific research at our colleges and universities, so that more young people can be inspired to do research,” said Gillibrand.

Check Also

Vice Adm. Matthew Kohler on Navy’s Current Information Warfare Approach

Vice Adm. Matthew Kohler, the top information warfare officer at the U.S. Navy, told C4ISRNET in an interview published Monday that the service considers information warfare as decisive both in daily operations and high-end kinetic fight. “In information warfare, while the rest of the warfare areas are involved in the high-end conflict [eventually], we consider the high-end conflict now. Constant contact with the enemy in terms of cybersecurity, being able to operate within the [electromagnetic spectrum], all of those. We consider ourselves in contact with the adversary now,” Kohler said. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *