Gen. John Raymond: Space Force Continues to Perform Missions Amid COVID-19

John Raymond
John Raymond

Gen. John Raymond, chief of space operations within the U.S. Space Force and a 2020 Wash100 Award winner, said the newly created service branch continues to carry out its missions amid the coronavirus pandemic, DoD News reported Friday.

"The men and women in U.S. Space Command and the U.S. Space Force are executing our 24/7, no-fail missions to protect and defend our nation's space centers," Raymond said Friday during a telephone news conference at the Pentagon.

He said Spacecom has launched efforts to provide additional bandwidth to respond to the request of Navy hospital ship USNS Mercy as it travels to Los Angeles to oversee trauma patients to help civilian hospitals accommodate those who are infected with COVID-19. "We optimize the constellation or the payloads to be able to provide that support," he said. "We're doing that for every request that we may get."

Raymond said 64 cadets at the Air Force Academy are expected to be commissioned into the Space Force in May. The new military branch is also “on track” to onboard up to 16,000 personnel from other services.

About The Wash100

This year represents our sixth annual Wash100 Award selection. The Wash100 is the premier group of private and public sector leaders selected by Executive Mosaic’s organizational and editorial leadership as the most influential leaders in the GovCon sector. These leaders demonstrate skills in leadership, innovation, achievement, and vision.

Visit the Wash100 site to learn about the other 99 winners of the 2020 Wash100 Award. On the site, you can submit your 10 votes for the GovCon executives of consequence that you believe will have the most significant impact in 2020.

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