Veritone Advances AI Analytics and Applications; Ryan Steelberg Quoted

Veritone Advances AI Analytics and Applications; Ryan Steelberg Quoted
Artificial Intelligence

Veritone has made recent enhancements to Veritone Discovery and Veritone Attribute, the company’s campaign analytics and attribution applications. With the upgrades, customers will expand advanced media search functionalities, advertising performance reporting and visualization that help drive revenue growth. 

Veritone Discovery is an AI-powered campaign search and analysis application designed to provide visibility into content performance. The company has updated the tool to feature Earned Media Monitoring that will enable users to track the added value they deliver in campaigns.

The company’s solution has also added New Reporting Customization will classify and summarize campaign results based on its components. Veritone’s enhanced AI Models will provide additional accuracy of key words and phrases, and expand support for foreign languages.

Veritone Attribute is an AI-enabled broadcast attribution application that correlates broadcast advertising placements with website interaction data in near real-time. Veritone has added new enhancements to its enterprise management and workflows, and advanced collaboration capabilities. 

Additionally, Veritone Attribute has integrated intelligent analytics, which include multi-dimensional charts and responsive data views, as well as improved analytics capabilities. 

“Our already comprehensive campaign search and analytics applications keep evolving as we work closely with our customers to continuously identify opportunities to help automate their processes,” said Ryan Steelberg, president of Veritone.

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