GDIT Wins Spot on State Department’s $3.3B Global Support Strategy Contract

GDIT Wins Spot on State Department’s $3.3B Global Support Strategy Contract
General Dynamics Information Technology

General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT) has been awarded a position on the U.S. Department of State's ten-year, $3.3 billion Global Support Strategy (GSS) 2.0 indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract vehicle, the company reported on Friday. 

"We have been providing visa-related services to the U.S. Department of State for more than 20 years and look forward to building on this legacy with innovative technical and process solutions to improve service efficiency and customer experience," said Paul Nedzbala, GDIT senior vice president for the federal civilian division.

As one of three prime contractors, GDIT will deliver overseas consulate support services to the Bureau of Consular Affairs. The company’s efforts will support visa application and issuance at U.S. embassies and consulates. 

"The Bureau of Consular Affairs is the department's public face for the global community, and this contract will provide responsive and efficient consular services to facilitate travel to the United States for millions of people," Nedzbala added. 

With the company’s spot on the contract, GDIT will build on its history with the Department of State. The company previously supported the GSS 1.0 contract, delivering services including fee collection, document delivery and mission-focused enterprise IT tailored to the complex global environment.

About General Dynamics 

General Dynamics is a global aerospace and defense company that offers a broad portfolio of products and services in business aviation; combat vehicles, weapons systems and munitions; IT services; C4ISR solutions; and shipbuilding and ship repair. General Dynamics employs more than 100,000 people worldwide and generated $39.4 billion in revenue in 2019. 

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