Bipartisan Senators Call for Interagency Group to Drive Allied Efforts on Emerging Technologies

Bipartisan Senators Call for Interagency Group to Drive Allied Efforts on Emerging Technologies
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A bipartisan group of senators have introduced legislation to establish an alliance between democratic nations against authoritarian regimes like the Chinese Communist Party.

Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va, Bob Menendez, D-N.J., Michael Bennet, D-Colo., John Cornyn, R-Texas, Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Ben Sasse, R-Neb., Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Todd Young, R-Ind., introduced the Democracy Technology Partnership Act aimed at standing up an interagency office within the State Department to drive allied efforts, Warner’s office said Thursday.

The interagency office will allocate $5 billion for an International Technology Partnership Fund for joint research efforts between U.S. and allied agencies, technology companies, universities and other stakeholders in addition to providing funding for third-country industries.

The partnership will also create a public-private International Technology Partnership Advisory Board that will provide insight to the Technology Partnership Office on matters such as international trade and emerging technologies.

Other functions under the alliance's purview include supporting the screening of investments related to key capabilities and identfying alternatives for countries at risk of purchasing technologies built by providers from authoritarian nations.

Nations interested in becoming a member of the alliance must have a democratic government with advanced technology industries, a record of expressing interest in U.S. intelligence and defense partnerships and “a strong commitment to democratic values”, according to the press release.

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