Army Unveils Software Factory in Texas; Gen. Mark Milley Quoted

Army Unveils Software Factory in Texas; Gen. Mark Milley Quoted
Gen. Mark Milley Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff

The U.S. Army opened its first software factory at the Austin Community College in Texas that will develop new applications and train soldier-coders on how to adopt technology to improve operations, FedScoop reported Monday.

The factory’s office space near Army Futures Command’s headquarters was launched in mid-April. The facility is now operational with its first cohort of software developers who started teleworking in Dec. 2020. A spokesperson for the Army said the service tapped VMware to help establish the office under another transaction authority agreement.

“This is the first time that we have a soldier-led [software] factory,” said Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and a four-time Wash100 Award recipient. “It has everything to do with modernization, seeing the future, and being able to prevent a great power war.”

Gen. John Murray, commander of Army Futures Command and a two-time Wash100 Award recipient, joined Milley during the opening ceremony for the new software factory.

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