DOE Labs, Companies Partner for Energy Technology Commercialization Projects; Secretary Jennifer Granholm Quoted

DOE Labs, Companies Partner for Energy Technology Commercialization Projects; Secretary Jennifer Granholm Quoted
Jennifer Granholm Secretary Department of Energy

Twelve Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have secured more than $65 million in federal and private sector funds to help bring energy technologies to the marketplace.

The government-sponsored labs will work with industry partners across 25 states and four countries through the 2021 Technology Commercialization Fund program, DOE said Thursday.

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory received $5.13 million, the largest share among all awards, to explore converters for fast charging and artificial intelligence for characterizing additive manufacturing, among other technologies.

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory secured $5.04 million, the second-highest share, for various research works such as hybrid power plants and offshore wind turbines.

Other topics under the 2021 TMF projects include improvements to lidar, cybersecurity applications for control rooms, alkaline water electrolysis and transactive energy service systems.

"These projects will help us deploy game-changing innovations that position us to win the clean energy race while creating jobs and opportunity across every pocket of the country," said Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm.

All 12 laboratories qualified for a TCF award after securing a commitment from their partners to match at least 50 percent of the anticipated federal funding.

To date, TCF has funded more than 380 projects and helped secure over $170 million from hundreds of partners from various industries.

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