Air Force Concludes 5th Architecture Demo, Evaluation for Increased Domain Awareness; Preston Dunlap Quoted

Air Force Concludes 5th Architecture Demo, Evaluation for Increased Domain Awareness; Preston Dunlap Quoted
Architecture Demonstration & Evaluation 5

The U.S. Air Force has completed its weeks-long exercise aimed at achieving increased domain awareness and decision superiority through a mission architecture powered by commercial innovations.

The fifth Architecture Demonstration and Evaluation event saw various U.S. military organizations integrating artificial intelligence, networking technologies, classified-level mobile devices and other capabilities from the private sector, the Air Force said Wednesday.

ADE combined emerging operational concepts from USAF and the Space Force and lessons gained from the previous third Global Information Dominance Experiment and Pacific Iron 2021 Agile Combat Employment exercises.

The event's objectives were to boost domain awareness, information dominance, decision superiority and global integration with the help of AI, cross-combatant command partnerships, feasibility studies and agile combat employment at the edge.

"Our goal at Department of the Air Force Architecture Demonstration and Evaluation 5 was to move DoD towards an integrated mission architecture that achieves AI-enabled decision superiority anywhere, from combatant commands all the way down to the edge, whether in competition or conflict," explained Preston Dunlap, chief architect of both USAF and Space Force.

The Chief Architect Office performs ADEs to bring together operators and technologies to help transition the DOD from the technology design phase to informed implementation.

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