Rep. Rick Larsen Highlights Need for U.S. Investment in Military Software Capabilities

Rep. Rick Larsen Highlights Need for U.S. Investment in Military Software Capabilities
Rep. Rick Larsen

Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., said the U.S. should invest in military software capabilities, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, to better compete with China, USNI News reported Friday.

“Cyber attacks are definitely in their interest,” Larsen said Friday during an online forum. But “the days of hiding behind hackers is over [for the Chinese government and the Chinese Communist Party] as are the days of the United States saying nothing.”

His remarks came days after the U.S. government and allies, including the U.K., European Union and NATO, attributed the Microsoft Exchange Server and other malicious cyber activities to threat actors with ties to China’s ministry of state security.

Larsen, who serves on the House Armed Services cyber, innovative technologies and information systems subcommittee, said that condemnation from U.S. and allies “provides a lever” for Indo-Pacific countries to use against China’s aggressive behavior.

He also noted that the Pentagon is taking advantage of AI investments the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has made in the past four decades and that 5G networks should not be easily breached.

“The security the Defense Department needs is far higher than what an individual needs,” Larsen added.

POC - Fall 2021 5G Summit

If you’re interested in 5G technology and 5G integration’s impact on public and private sectors, then check out Potomac Officers Club’s Fall 2021 5G Summit coming up on Sept. 16. To register for this virtual forum and view other upcoming events, visit the POC Events page. 

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