Trade Association Urges U.S. Government to Speed Up Implementation of Aircraft Engine Emission Rules

Trade Association Urges U.S. Government to Speed Up Implementation of Aircraft Engine Emission Rules
Aircraft Engine Emission

The Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) is calling on the U.S. government to expedite review of potential rule changes for aircraft engines to facilitate the implementation of global standards meant to reduce soot emissions ahead of the 2023 deadline and avoid any potential supply chain disruption, Reuters reported Friday.

"Any delay to regulatory implementation would create uncertainty, potentially significantly impacting our supply chain, airline deliveries, and damage U.S. industry’s overall global competitiveness," Leslie Riegle, assistant vice president of civil aviation at AIA, told the news agency.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to come up with a final rule on aircraft engines by September 2022 and any rule changes should be reviewed and approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

General Electric has urged the current administration to speed up the rulemaking process in order for engine makers to have "clear standards for demonstrating compliance prior to the 2023 deadline." 

The Biden administration announced Thursday several federal actions as part of efforts to reduce aviation emissions by 20 percent by 2030 and achieve a zero-carbon aviation sector by 2050.

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