Amentum Secures Spot on Potential $950M RISE Contract; Greg Ihde Quoted

Amentum Secures Spot on Potential $950M RISE Contract; Greg Ihde Quoted
Amentum

Amentum announced on Wednesday the company secured a potential $950 million five-year Air Force Life Cycle Management Center indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract to provide infrastructure, supporting tools and services for its threat radar systems and combat training ranges.

The Range IDIQ Support Effort (RISE) multiple award contract requires Amentum to execute task orders relating to radar systems and combat training ranges and support for joint threat emitter platforms and modernization programs of the U.S. Air Force’s range threat systems branch.

“Amentum is pleased to be included among the companies awarded a position on the RISE IDIQ, which will allow the Air Force to support and modernize its range threat systems. We look forward to bringing our deep experience as the premier test and training range provider to support the service’s needs on an as-required basis,” commented Greg Ihde, Amentum’s senior vice president Operations, Warfighter Support Sector.

The company will perform whatever work is required from Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

 About Amentum

Amentum is a leading global technology and engineering services partner supporting critical programs of national significance across defense, security, intelligence, energy and environment. The company draws from a century-old heritage of operational excellence, mission focus, and successful execution underpinned by a strong safety and ethics culture. Headquartered in Germantown, Md, Amentum employs more than 34,000 people in all 50 states and works in 105 foreign countries and territories.

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