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ManTech Names Yvonne Vervaet as SVP of Growth and Capabilities

ManTech has promoted Yvonne Vervaet as senior vice president of growth and capabilities, the Herndon, Va., company announced Tuesday. Previously, Vervaet served as chief growth officer of its mission, cyber & intelligence solutions group.

As part of her responsibilities, Veraet will establish growth strategy by ensuring business methods, capabilities and technologies align with federal budgets and the company’s pipeline. ManTech said she will begin reporting to Chief Executive Officer Kevin M. Phillips on Nov. 1st.

“During her time at ManTech, Yvonne Vervaet has been a powerful force driving major contract awards from the intelligence community, including our recent wins of $668 million with the Department of Homeland Security for CDM and nearly $1 billion with a major defense agency for secured enterprise IT,” commented Phillips.

“In her new corporate role as senior vice president of growth and capabilities she will apply this same energy, strategic thinking and winning attitude to innovations that advance the missions of all ManTech customers – and grow our business,” Phillips added.

With over 26 years’ experience in the GovCon sector, Vervaet has held leadership roles at BAE, Northrop Grumman, EDS and CSC.

“ManTech’s rapid growth reflects our 100 percent dedication to supporting customers’ missions with innovative, results-focused technologies,” Vervaet told GovConDaily Tuesday. “I am very excited by this opportunity to help lead the many investments and remarkable ManTech individuals ‘securing the future’ for our clients’ critical missions.”

The promotion follows ManTech’s September appointment of Adam Rudo, a veteran of General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin, as SVP and general manager of its security solutions business.

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